The Rare and Ferocious Swamp Rabbit

Expat living in the UK. BPD, PCOS, A-OK.

Just another Tumblr Feminist/Social Justice Warrior. (I will respect your triggers and will post warnings just ask.)

WARNING: Sometimes I get angry and get into long-winded arguments. I don't believe in being cruel in call-outs to those within your own community, but if you're a racist/sexist/homophobe I believe you have lost the right to basic politeness.

hoatzinandtamaraw reblogged your post karkalim: therareandferociousswamprab… and added:

Yuuuup that is exactly the point I have reached. SERENITY NOW!!

YUUUUUP. *le sigh*

karkalim:

therareandferociousswamprabbit:

hoatzinandtamaraw:

It’s probably not healthy to be so pissed off all of the time

I feel you so hard. I watch other people approach conflict and irritation rationally and I’m like “DID YOU GO TO WIZARDING SCHOOL? YOU ASSHOLE?”

Psssh. All you have to do is channel your rage into more of a cold fury and turn it into aggressive politeness! And eventually lose that veneer and become actually full of rage and start cursing everyone out. 

… Hm. You may have a point.

Assholes able to process they emotions are goddamned wizards, I tell you!

msniiina:

internet needs me

(via thesylverlining)

hoatzinandtamaraw:

It’s probably not healthy to be so pissed off all of the time

I feel you so hard. I watch other people approach conflict and irritation rationally and I’m like “DID YOU GO TO WIZARDING SCHOOL? YOU ASSHOLE?”

ashleighthelion:

YESSSSSSSSSSSS.

(via muslimrave)

many-splendored-rat:

I have almost a month’s worth of photos to post & it’s not obvious that they’re old till I get to shots of the babies with their eyes not open yet. :P  This is Baker.

Asker Anonymous Asks:
How was the sex with Zoe Quinn? I ask because with all the evidence against her the only reason you could still be defending her is she gave you sex or you're really, really, really stupid. So which is it?
therareandferociousswamprabbit therareandferociousswamprabbit Said:

disposable-ninja:

karkalim:

Golly gee, I wish I had sex with her. She’s really pretty, don’t you think? In any case, the evidence against her has actually been refuted several times, but you know, whatever. It doesn’t really matter what you think. Do you know why it doesn’t matter? I don’t care. I’ll tell you anyways. Because you, dear child, are a pathetic little coward. You are such an incredible coward that you won’t even show who you are when you insult me. What are you afraid of, hm? Are you worried that the Feminist Gaming Illuminati are going to DDOS your blog? Someone who is afraid to show their face when expressing their opinion doesn’t deserve to have an opinion. So come on now, little one. Show your face. Prove to me that you’re worth my time. Then, maybe, I might deign to speak to you. Until then, enjoy your day.

I keep seeing people saying that the allegations against Zoe Quinn have been refuted. But, uh, which ones? Because there are a lot. Also: how? To my knowledge there’s no proof that Quinn was doxed and harassed several months ago by wizardchan, so any evidence that she actually was harassed by them would disprove the allegation that she made it up.

Or how about the allegation that she harassed her colleague, Wolf Wozniak, in March? Or that she emotionally abused her boyfriend, Eron Gjoni — is there proof that the chatlogs he posted were all faked and that she did not, in fact, threaten to kill herself in order to control him?

Is she not connected to Silverstring Media? Can we somehow prove that all the people she had sex with were not individuals she could use to elevate and protect her career?

Is there evidence that somehow there wasn’t a concentrated effort by the Games Journalist Industry to shut down discussion of her activities and keep people from knowing about the terrible things she (may or may not) have done?

Please, by all means, tell me how all of that and all the other stuff has been refuted. I really would like to know.

ALSO ALSO: you do realize that you can send Anonymous Asks even if you don’t have a tumblr account, right? Also that you can turn off Anonymous Asks, as well.

Dear Piss Babies.

Hi. How have you been? How is Whiny Piss-Baby Camp? I know it’s been a while and I hope that your misogynist endeavours to overthrow the gynarchy are progressing well. I’m doing pretty good

A) What does Zoe Quinn’s relationship have to do with the gaming industry? Do you really think that her personal life is somehow the selling point of her games? If so, I hope you have a receipt for that bag of stupid that you bought, cause you need to get your money back. From the sounds of it this was two fucked up people in a pretty fucked up relationship. All we have is side of the person who is TOTALLY the sane one. What with creating a 10 000 word blog devoted to “unmasking her.” But not like, cause he was bitter, but because he was doing it for her fans and the gaming community.

Not one-sided at all, totally reasonable behaviour. 

B) Can you prove that the powers of her vagina were used to further her career? Did you know that sometimes people have sex with each other just for the intercourse and not for evil plots? Did you know that there are people with undue influence and lots of money that have left tangible proof of their misdeeds in gaming journalism corruption but you are choosing to focus on a single woman who barely makes an income? Because: reasons. Right?

C) You do realise that after everything is said and done you’re apparently fighting for video.games. Corruption in reviewing is the current bogeyman you’re using to hide behind, right? Not corruption in motor vehicle safety reviews, not corruption in political journalism, not corruption in the FDA, DEA, Immigration,etc etc etc. You know, stuff that actually has the ability to horrifically ruin lives or kill people?

Anti-fems are super fond of the line “why don’t you work against real issues.” They actually mean to say “why don’t you practice white feminist imperialism and go to like, India and help let women take off their turbans or something?” (I’ve gotten hypothetical questions that loaded with stupid, so don’t. scoff!) The answer is of course that all forms of oppression are oppression, and you can fight against many on different levels simultaneously.

But you Gamergate assholes are just concerned with misogyny and tribalism. Which woman is lying (in your view) about what, which chick did something bitchy, which designer DARED to call their non-mmoorpg, non-1st person shooter a video game on your watch, etc, etc.

You do realise that Tumblr and Twitter are just teeming with sockpuppets from douchebags astroturfing to harass people who are anti-harassment into silence, right? So even if my friend here were to turn off Anon (which isn’t just used for shitposting, FYI) then another screwball with a few too many oppressed manly thoughts can just get on the ol’ second faceless account and harass from there?

Anyway, I hope camp is fun and all the other assholes are being nice to you. Please keep focusing on bullshit, cause I guess it keeps you morons from trying to influence things that actually matter (?)

Love,

Swamp Rabbit

P.S. Here are some smart people with smart and compassionate things to say.

https://storify.com/Firebomb173/katherine-cross-on-gamergate-and-change-in-gaming?utm_campaign=&utm_medium=sfy.co-twitter&utm_content=storify-pingback&utm_source=t.co&awesm=sfy.co_dt3T

https://storify.com/a_man_in_black/gamergate-sexism-and-tribalism

my-little-underground:

blindbeards0llux:

ask-an-mra-anything9:

cakeandrevolution:

Bottom line: If you oppose raising the minimum wage you’re saying that some people don’t deserve to be able to feed and shelter themselves and you’re trash.

Yet I bet these feminists would have no problem with raising the minimum wage for women only, leaving men unable to feed or shelter themselves. Because feminists are trash.

image

Hey I think Fox News is hiring! With that fucking nonsensical ideology you will fit in there like a glove

thepeoplesrecord:

TW: Rape, transmisogyny - A transgender woman says she was locked in a cell with her rapistSeptember 29, 2014
The odds were already against Zahara Green when she entered prison on May 10, 2012. Prisons have long been plagued by a culture of sexual harassment and assault, but Green was a transgender woman in an all-male facility — making her about 13 times more likely to be sexually assaulted than a non-transgender inmate,according to a 2009 study.
Green told BuzzFeed News she distinctly remembers her first day in general population at Rogers State Prison, a facility about an hour and a half outside of Savannah, Georgia. It was two months into her sentence, and she said she can still envision the officer dropping her off at her dorm and walking away.
“I kind of just felt that he was letting me out with the wolves. You’re on your own. It clicked in my mind,” she said. “I found my bed, I placed my stuff on my bed, and then I sat there for about an hour and people were just coming in and out as if this was some kind of showcase.”
Under federal law, states must seriously consider transgender inmates’ safety concerns — and the Georgia Department of Corrections has said it has zero tolerance for sexual misconduct. Yet the state of Georgia placed Green in a men’s prison, where she faced a greater risk of being assaulted. Around the country, decisions on transgender inmates’ placement and their level of protection are ultimately made on a case-by-case basis. But according to her lawsuit, these often ambiguous decisions and lack of safety oversight may have played a role in Zahara Green’s alleged rape by another inmate — not while they mingled in general population, but while she was being secured in “protective custody.”
Green was approached by Darryl Ricard — a high-ranking gang member within the prison, she said — right after moving to the dorm at Rogers. He was in his seventh year of a life sentence for aggravated child molestation, rape, and kidnapping.
“He basically made me his property,” she said.
Over the next few weeks, as Ricard repeatedly coerced her to perform oral sex on him, Green would write to prison administrative staff about the unsafe environment for transgender and homosexual inmates, Green said. Rogers State Prison housed one other transgender woman at the time, to Green’s knowledge, although Green was the only one receiving hormone treatment. In one letter, she says she mentioned being sexually targeted by Ricard.
Shortly afterward, she requested to be put into protective custody, which is typically a solitary cell for prisoners who believe their safety is at risk, carefully monitored by prison officials. What allegedly happened next makes up the bulk of a lawsuit Green and her Atlanta-based lawyer Mario Williams filed in May against the prison’s warden, deputy warden, and two correctional officers. Last week, they filed another complaint against an additional 13 additional correctional officers.
On Sept. 21, 2012, Green and Ricard were separately admitted into protective custody. According to Green, Ricard was the chief reason she had requested the special security measures. But for still unclear reasons, when Green entered her protective custody cell around 4:30 a.m., “Ricard was waiting” there, the complaint says. “Ricard raped Green, and the Defendants to this action all knew Ricard was going to rape (or at the very least, sexually assault) Green yet permitted Ricard to sexually assault Green.” The correction officers allegedly “condoned” the rape.
According to Williams, Green’s attorney, Green and Ricard had been assigned to different protective custody cells, and Ricard should have never been allowed in Green’s cell. Nearly 24 hours passed, though security checks were supposed to be made at least every 30 minutes. Williams said he believes the Georgia Department of Corrections knew about the situation and did nothing to prevent Green’s assault. The department declined to comment on the case to BuzzFeed News, citing pending litigation.
“Everyone has to wonder how Green’s assailant got put in protective custody on the same day and same time as Green. Then permitted to be in Green’s cell for nearly 24 hours,” Williams said. “This case is about more than Ricard. There has been official misconduct.”In a court document responding to Green’s complaint, a lawyer for the defendants — repeatedly referring to Green as “he” — denied that the deputy warden had read any letter about Ricard’s “oral sodomy” of Green. The response noted that Green’s mother had contacted the prison about her daughter’s safety concerns, but alleged that when asked directly, Green said she “was not afraid.” The response also said that Green was “at some point … placed in the same cell as inmate Darryl Ricard.”
While the case moves forward, some local and national groups have begun rallying around Green. One of the first people to reach out to her was Kenneth Glasgow of the Ordinary People Society. He describes Green as “humble and quiet,” but also “tormented and traumatized,” unable to talk at length about the incident; while Green spoke to BuzzFeed News on Wednesday, she once paused to keep from crying.
After the alleged assault — when Green eventually got a guard’s attention — a sergeant came to the cell, she said. He apparently saw Ricard with a razor blade in his hand and stuck pepper spray through an opening in the cell door. Ricard quickly surrendered, Green said, and they were both separately removed from the cell. Later, Green was taken to a sexual assault examination nurse, who performed a rape kit.
Green was kept in protective custody for the next week and a half. Then she was transferred to Georgia State Prison, a facility down the street, where she immediately requested protective custody. Eventually she was placed in a unit made up a several single cells housing all transgender inmates. “I was the sixth or seventh on transgender hormone therapy,” Green said. She felt safe there.
But it wasn’t until her final transfer — to Atlanta Transitional Facility — that Green said she felt her life begin to change for the better.
Green was 17 when she began transitioning. It wasn’t long after that she began shoplifting from various Walmarts — landing her with a prison sentence and a life ban from the retailer. She says she doesn’t think this anymore, but at the time, theft felt like her only option.
“I did not think it was possible to find a job as a transgender person in Georgia. All the trans people I knew were either shoplifting, forging checks, or prostituting,” she said. “I didn’t know a single transgender person who had a job.”
At the transitional center, “they opened my eyes to another way,” she said. She’s been on parole since her release in March. In August, she began school, working to become a paralegal. She has a job at Walgreens. She’s helped her other transgender friends find jobs. She’s 25 now and said, “There’s a better life for me.”
She hopes one outcome of the lawsuit is that transgender people are not tested out in general population before officials decide it’s not a safe fit. While the federal Prison Rape Elimination Act forces states to take transgender inmates’ safety concerns into consideration, Harper Jean Tobin of the National Center for Transgender Equality said it’s not clear that they always do. (In Georgia, another transgender inmate is currently fighting for her access to hormone therapy in a high-profile case.)
“If institutions are able to make the culture shift … toward not making those auto assumptions but really focusing on what is keeping each person safe,” Tobin said, “they will start making those placements in women’s facilities more often.”
Source

thepeoplesrecord:

TW: Rape, transmisogyny - A transgender woman says she was locked in a cell with her rapist
September 29, 2014

The odds were already against Zahara Green when she entered prison on May 10, 2012. Prisons have long been plagued by a culture of sexual harassment and assault, but Green was a transgender woman in an all-male facility — making her about 13 times more likely to be sexually assaulted than a non-transgender inmate,according to a 2009 study.

Green told BuzzFeed News she distinctly remembers her first day in general population at Rogers State Prison, a facility about an hour and a half outside of Savannah, Georgia. It was two months into her sentence, and she said she can still envision the officer dropping her off at her dorm and walking away.

“I kind of just felt that he was letting me out with the wolves. You’re on your own. It clicked in my mind,” she said. “I found my bed, I placed my stuff on my bed, and then I sat there for about an hour and people were just coming in and out as if this was some kind of showcase.”

Under federal law, states must seriously consider transgender inmates’ safety concerns — and the Georgia Department of Corrections has said it has zero tolerance for sexual misconduct. Yet the state of Georgia placed Green in a men’s prison, where she faced a greater risk of being assaulted. Around the country, decisions on transgender inmates’ placement and their level of protection are ultimately made on a case-by-case basis. But according to her lawsuit, these often ambiguous decisions and lack of safety oversight may have played a role in Zahara Green’s alleged rape by another inmate — not while they mingled in general population, but while she was being secured in “protective custody.”

Green was approached by Darryl Ricard — a high-ranking gang member within the prison, she said — right after moving to the dorm at Rogers. He was in his seventh year of a life sentence for aggravated child molestation, rape, and kidnapping.

“He basically made me his property,” she said.

Over the next few weeks, as Ricard repeatedly coerced her to perform oral sex on him, Green would write to prison administrative staff about the unsafe environment for transgender and homosexual inmates, Green said. Rogers State Prison housed one other transgender woman at the time, to Green’s knowledge, although Green was the only one receiving hormone treatment. In one letter, she says she mentioned being sexually targeted by Ricard.

Shortly afterward, she requested to be put into protective custody, which is typically a solitary cell for prisoners who believe their safety is at risk, carefully monitored by prison officials. What allegedly happened next makes up the bulk of a lawsuit Green and her Atlanta-based lawyer Mario Williams filed in May against the prison’s warden, deputy warden, and two correctional officers. Last week, they filed another complaint against an additional 13 additional correctional officers.

On Sept. 21, 2012, Green and Ricard were separately admitted into protective custody. According to Green, Ricard was the chief reason she had requested the special security measures. But for still unclear reasons, when Green entered her protective custody cell around 4:30 a.m., “Ricard was waiting” there, the complaint says. “Ricard raped Green, and the Defendants to this action all knew Ricard was going to rape (or at the very least, sexually assault) Green yet permitted Ricard to sexually assault Green.” The correction officers allegedly “condoned” the rape.

According to Williams, Green’s attorney, Green and Ricard had been assigned to different protective custody cells, and Ricard should have never been allowed in Green’s cell. Nearly 24 hours passed, though security checks were supposed to be made at least every 30 minutes. Williams said he believes the Georgia Department of Corrections knew about the situation and did nothing to prevent Green’s assault. The department declined to comment on the case to BuzzFeed News, citing pending litigation.

“Everyone has to wonder how Green’s assailant got put in protective custody on the same day and same time as Green. Then permitted to be in Green’s cell for nearly 24 hours,” Williams said. “This case is about more than Ricard. There has been official misconduct.”

In a court document responding to Green’s complaint, a lawyer for the defendants — repeatedly referring to Green as “he” — denied that the deputy warden had read any letter about Ricard’s “oral sodomy” of Green. The response noted that Green’s mother had contacted the prison about her daughter’s safety concerns, but alleged that when asked directly, Green said she “was not afraid.” The response also said that Green was “at some point … placed in the same cell as inmate Darryl Ricard.”

While the case moves forward, some local and national groups have begun rallying around Green. One of the first people to reach out to her was Kenneth Glasgow of the Ordinary People Society. He describes Green as “humble and quiet,” but also “tormented and traumatized,” unable to talk at length about the incident; while Green spoke to BuzzFeed News on Wednesday, she once paused to keep from crying.

After the alleged assault — when Green eventually got a guard’s attention — a sergeant came to the cell, she said. He apparently saw Ricard with a razor blade in his hand and stuck pepper spray through an opening in the cell door. Ricard quickly surrendered, Green said, and they were both separately removed from the cell. Later, Green was taken to a sexual assault examination nurse, who performed a rape kit.

Green was kept in protective custody for the next week and a half. Then she was transferred to Georgia State Prison, a facility down the street, where she immediately requested protective custody. Eventually she was placed in a unit made up a several single cells housing all transgender inmates. “I was the sixth or seventh on transgender hormone therapy,” Green said. She felt safe there.

But it wasn’t until her final transfer — to Atlanta Transitional Facility — that Green said she felt her life begin to change for the better.

Green was 17 when she began transitioning. It wasn’t long after that she began shoplifting from various Walmarts — landing her with a prison sentence and a life ban from the retailer. She says she doesn’t think this anymore, but at the time, theft felt like her only option.

“I did not think it was possible to find a job as a transgender person in Georgia. All the trans people I knew were either shoplifting, forging checks, or prostituting,” she said. “I didn’t know a single transgender person who had a job.”

At the transitional center, “they opened my eyes to another way,” she said. She’s been on parole since her release in March. In August, she began school, working to become a paralegal. She has a job at Walgreens. She’s helped her other transgender friends find jobs. She’s 25 now and said, “There’s a better life for me.”

She hopes one outcome of the lawsuit is that transgender people are not tested out in general population before officials decide it’s not a safe fit. While the federal Prison Rape Elimination Act forces states to take transgender inmates’ safety concerns into consideration, Harper Jean Tobin of the National Center for Transgender Equality said it’s not clear that they always do. (In Georgia, another transgender inmate is currently fighting for her access to hormone therapy in a high-profile case.)

“If institutions are able to make the culture shift … toward not making those auto assumptions but really focusing on what is keeping each person safe,” Tobin said, “they will start making those placements in women’s facilities more often.”

Source

(via little-house-of-kurian)

In 1937, my great-grandfather started a workwear company in New England called Madewell. In 2006, 17 years after the last factory shut down, J.Crew relaunched a women’s clothing company with the same name and logo, based on a 50-year history in which it had no part.

I stopped dead on Broadway, in the middle of the sidewalk, and stared, not up at the beautiful wrought-iron SoHo buildings, as would befit someone who’d moved to New York in the past month, but at an ordinary sign advertising a small clothing shop. The logo, a casual cursive scrawl with both E’s capitalized, jumped out at me like a beacon from a lighthouse somewhere deep in the back of my brain. That was the logo emblazoned on my baby clothes, the logo my great-grandfather created. It was, I thought, forgotten family history, the factories having shut down shortly after I was born in the ’80s. After a moment I took out my phone and called my mom and asked her what the hell was going on.

Jesse Williams speaks the truth (X)

(via thepoliticalfreakshow)

Can’t wait to try this recipe for misandry pancakes copied from the comments section of Cookie Misandry:

Gingerbread man aside: this is NOT AS HARD AS IT LOOKS. Don’t be intimidated by the length of the ingredient list.

Dry:
1 1/2 c all purpose flour
2 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1 tsp ground ginger
2 tsp cinnamon

Not dry:
1 egg
1/2 tsp vanilla
1/4 c blackstrap molasses (note: most molasses you find in the store will be blackstrap)
1 c milk

Whisk together the dry ingredients in a bowl.

Using a mixer, combine the egg, vanilla and molasses until smooth. Add milk and combine. Or, I guess you could use a whisk but I don’t put in that much effort.

Dump in the dry ingredients and mix (with the whisk, not the mixer) until barely combined. You will have a thick, gloppy batter with myriad tiny lumps.

This takes all of 10 minutes to put together the batter, and yields 8-10 pancakes if you pour by 1/4 cupfuls like I do.

(via heyitsxio)

blackcloudedmind replied to your post “Uuuh….Someone please write an IRL guide for how to deal with rude…”

Okay: Here’s how it should go: Step #1: block them from your email. Done! “Sorry guy, didn’t see one email. Try again”.

That would be super fun, but sadly it’s a Google Group and there is no way to “miss” an email…People suck. Push ‘em all into a volcano, let an old world god sort them out.

rubyetc:

california dreamin